Book Reviews

What People Have to Say About the Book

Chicken Nibbles (Cartoons about Backyard Chickens) by Alan Corbett provides a humorous look at the behavior of backyard chickens, with comic panels drawn by Cartoonist Mark Lynch. Readers familiar with chickens will recognize common behavior found in hens and roosters that they might have experienced first-hand, and readers new to chickens will learn many funny and unexpected facts about these unique barn yard animals. From aggressive roosters protecting their flock to hens maintaining their pecking order, these cartoons are sure to inspire laughter and bring a smile to the reader’s face.

This was a fun and interesting book, and I enjoyed reading it. Before each cartoon, there was information about common chicken behavior or chicken-related words, and these fun facts were used as the basis for the cartoons. Most of the cartoons were self-explanatory, but there were a few cases where certain Australian terms were used and some additional explanation was helpful to ensure that non Australian readers would be able to understand the joke. The cartoons in this book had a professional appearance, and I liked the artist’s use of bright colors and the individual personalities shown in the chickens’ expressions. My favorite cartoon was the chickens “playing chicken” with rebellious hens sporting a tattoo and piercings and taking a selfie in the face of danger. Many of the cartoons were taken from an earlier book written and illustrated by the author of this book, and it was interesting to compare the two drawings and see the differences between this version and the original cartoons. While most of the cartoons can be enjoyed by readers of all ages, there were a few that are not suitable for young children.

Although the cartoons varied and I did not feel that any of them should have been excluded, there was a bit of repetition in some of the facts. This could have been eliminated by changing the format of the book, so that a specific fact had multiple cartoons following it, rather than a page of information or explanation preceding every cartoon. But these are minor points in an otherwise wonderful book that I highly recommend.

Chicken Nibbles is a unique educational book that teaches readers about chickens in a fun and humorous way that will surely delight and educate readers of any age.

Literary Titan

The explanations are excellent and the illustrations so depict the words. It’s endless laughter from the first page to the last – ENJOY!

Leslie

Moss Vale, NSW

This book has given all ages in our household a great belly laugh. It shows the frustrations we as chicken owners have to deal with and I have actually learnt a few tricks and things I didn’t know too. The cartoons are very high quality, lovely colours and drawings. This book would be perfect to buy for yourself or as a gift to your chicken loving friends and family.

Cathy

Bundaberg, Queensland

I only kept a half-dozen RI Reds in a run, but I found most of these cartoons easy to understand. The one about coop cleaning made me laugh. My pig was quite honestly tidier than the chickens.

I was quite tickled at the chickens dancing to country music because I live in line-dance country and “Boot Scootin’ Boogie” is one of the popular ones. I’m glad the chooks liked it.

The escapist chicken reminded me of my boyhood when a man named Arnold used to give me a nickel for every escaped chicken I brought back. I told him about the hole in his fence. He never fixed it. I think he just liked the company.

I was edgy upon seeing the “touch and go” panel because the skid marks reminded me too much of Hitchcock’s “The Birds”! 😃

The author has done some standout work with these cartoons.

Rick

Texas, USA

I am not a chook or chicken owner but I know someone who is and I bought this book for him.

I opened the package and looked through the book. Honestly, I had a good laugh before I rewrapped and posted it to my friend.

Mind you, I would’ve been a bit lost at times as a non chicken owner, had each cartoon not had an explanation to help me understand some of the humour.

In fact, I still haven’t figured out the one with the hen at the chalkboard looking at a red cross she had made? The explanation here was quite cryptic.

I don’t think I will ever have chickens. They are too messy and roosters freak me out. However, my friend loved the book, gave me a half dozen organic free range eggs, and a peck to say thank you. Which, while a little less than what I had hoped for, was a start at least.

Dinah

Moore Park Beach, Queensland